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修辞

L1

Personification

A moment later, the hurricane, in one mighty swipe,

lifted the entire roof off the house and skimmed it 40 feet through the air. (P.18)

No hurricane has ever bothered it. (P.3)

It seized a 600,000 gallon Gulfport oil tank and dumped it 3.5 miles away. (P.19)

Metaphor

We can batten down and ride it out. (P. 4)

Wind and rain now whipped the house. (P. 7)

Camille, meanwhile, had raked its way northward across Mississippi,…(P.32)

Strips of clothing festooned the standing trees. (P.

28)

Household and medical supplies streamed in …(P.31)

Simile

The children went from adult to adult like buckets in

a fire brigade. (P.11)

The wind sounded like the roar of a train passing a few yards away. (P.13)

…and blowndown power lines coiled like black spaghetti over the road. (P.28)

Telephone poles and 20-inch-thick pines cracked like guns …

The apartments were smashed apart as if by a gigantic fist.

Transferred epithet

…to watch the storm from their spectacular vantage point.

Onomatopoeia

Telephone poles and 20-inch-thick pines cracked like guns …

L2

Rhetorical questions

What does Morocco mean to a Frenchman?

Or to an Englishman? Camels, castles, palm trees…(P.17)

Are they really the same flesh as your self? Do they even have names? Or are they merely a kind of undifferentiated

brown stuff, about as individual as bees or coral

insects?…(P.3)

Euphemism :

No one would think of running cheap trips to the

Distressed Areas.( P17)

How long before they turn their guns in the other direction? ( P25 Simile

◆Long limes of women, bent double like inverted capital Ls,

work their way slowly across the field… (P.18)

◆And really it was like watching a flock of cattle to see

the long column, a mile or two miles of armed men…(P.26) Synecdoche

◆ a white skin is always fairly conspicuous

◆( a person with white skin) (para. 16)

Transferred epithet

there was a frenzied rush of Jews

(the Jews were in a frenzied state) (para.10) Onomatopoeia

The Negroes were marching southward …with a clumping of boots and clatter of iron wheels

L4

Paralleled structure

?…born in this century, tempered by war, disciplined by a hard and bitter peace…

?(P.3)

?…pay any price, bear any burden, meet any hardship, support any friend…

?(P.4)

Repetition of phrases

?(P.6,7,8,10,11)

?To those old allies…

?To those new states…

?To those peoples…

?To those nations…

?(P.15-18)

Let both sides…

Antithesis

?United, there is little…Divided, there is little…(P.6)?If a free society cannot.. Who are rich. (P.8)

?Let both sides explore…divided us. (P.15)

? My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America will do for you, but what together we can do for the freedom of man. (P26)

Chiasmus

?And so, my fellow Americans ask not what your country can do for you;ask what you can do for your country.(P25)

Allusion

?The first one hundred days

Let both sides unite to heed in all corners of the earth the command of Isaiah to “ undo the heavy burdens

Metaphor

●The energy, the faith, the devotion which we bring to this

endeavor will light our country and all who serve it. And the

glow from that fire can truly light the world. (P24)

●The torch has been passed to a new generation of

Americans. (P3)

●…if a beachhead of cooperation may push back the jungle of

suspicion…(P19)

Metaphor

?But this peaceful revolution of hope cannot become the prey of hostile powers.(P9)

?sought power by riding the back of the tiger ended up inside.

(P7)

?And let every other power know … remain the master of its own house.( 9)

?To strengthen its shield of the new and the weak

Hyperbole

?…the role of defending freedom in its hour of maximum danger

Alliteration

?Let the word go forth from this time and place, to friend and foe

Euphemism

?hard and bitter peace (cold war)

Synecdoche

?Yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind’s final war

Metonymy

?Yet both racing to alter that uncertain balance of terror that stays the hand of mankind’s final war

L5

Simile

?1. My brain was as powerful as a dynamo, as precise as a

chemist's scales, as penetrating as a scalpel.

?2. Same age, same background, but dumb as an ox.

?3. He looked like a mound of dead raccoons.

?4. The raccoon coat huddled like a great hairy beast at his

feet.

?5. I leaped to my feet, bellowing like a bull.

6. It was like digging a tunnel.

Repetition

?1. I was getting nowhere with this girl, absolutely nowhere.

?2. I’d give anything for a raccoon coat. Anything.

Metaphor

?1. Charles Lamb, … unfettered the informal essay with his

memorable Old China and Dream's Children.

?2. There follows an informal essay that ventures even

beyond Lamb's frontier.

?3. Don't you want to be in the swim?

?4. Maybe somewhere in the extinct crater of her mind, a

few embers still smoldered.

?5. Maybe somehow I could fan them into flame.

?6. The first man has poisoned the well before anybody could

drink from it.

?7. He has hamstrung his opponent before he could even

start.

?8. You are the whole world to me, and the moon and the

stars and the constellations of outer space.

?9. Logic, far from being a dry, pedantic discipline, is a living,

breathing thing, full of beauty, passion, and trauma.

?10. At first everything was work, sweat, and darkness. I had

no idea when I would reach the light, or even if I would. But

I persisted. I pounded and clawed and scraped, and finally I

was rewarded. I saw a chink of light. And then the chink got bigger and the sun came pouring in and all was bright.

?11. First he looked at the coat with the expression of a waif

at a bakery window.

?12. Back and forth his head swiveled, desire waxing,

resolution waning .

Mixed metaphor

?My brain, that precision instrument, slipped into high gear. Metonymy

?1. She was, to be sure, a girl who excited the emotions but I

was not one to let my heart rule my head.

?2. You are guilty of Post Hoc.( You are guilty of the logical

fallacy called Post Hoc.)

?3. Surgeons have X-rays to guide them during an operation.

4. The time had come to change the relationship from academic to romantic

Parody

?What's Polly to me, or me to Polly?

?( Hamlet by Shakespeare: What’s Hecuba to him or he to

Hecuba that he shold weep for her?)

Synecdoche

?There is a limit to what flesh and blood can bear. Hyperbole

?1. My brain was as powerful as a dynamo, as precise as a

chemist's scales, as penetrating as a scalpel.

?2. It is not often that one so young has such a giant intellect.

?3. "Holy Toledo!" he repeated fifteen or twenty times.

?4. he just stood and stared with mad lust at the coat.

?5. I had made a logician out of Polly.

?6. I paused for a moment while my massive brain chose the

proper words.

Euphemism

?Intelligent she was not. In fact, she veered in the opposite

direction.

Understatement (Litotes)

?This loomed as a project of no small dimensions. Antithesis

?1. It is, after all, easier to make a beautiful dumb girl smart

than to make an ugly smart girl beautiful.

?2. Back and forth his head swiveled, desire waxing,

resolution waning .

?3. If there is an irresistible force, there can be no immovable

object. If there is an immovable object, there can be no

irresistible force.

Transferred epithet

I said with a mysterious wink and closed my bag and left. Parallelism

?1. My brain was as powerful as a dynamo, as precise as a

chemist's scales, as penetrating as a scalpel.

?2. After he promised, after he made the deal, after he shook

my hand!

Rhetorical question

?1. Could Carlyle do more? Could Ruskin ?

?2. Who knew?

Allusion

?1. Just as Pygmalion loved the perfect woman he had

fashioned, so I loved mine.

?2. I was Frankenstein, and my monster had me by the

throat.

L14

Metaphor

●Metaphor … sitcoms cloned and canned in Hollywood, …

preempt the airways from California.

●So much of well-to-do America now lives antiseptically in

enclaves, tranquil and luxurious, that shut out the world.

●New York was never Mecca to me.

Alliteration

●Metaphor … sitcoms cloned and canned in Hollywood, …

preempt the airways from California.

Metonymy

●New York was never Mecca to me.

●Tin Pan Alley has moved to Nashville and Hollywood.

●So much of well-to-do America now lives antiseptically in

enclaves, tranquil and luxurious, that shut out the world. Personification

●Nature constantly yields to man in New York: witness those

fragile sidewalk trees gamely struggling against encroaching cement and petrol fumes.

Characteristically, the city swallows up the United Nations and refuses to take it seriously, regarding it as an unworkable mixture of the idealistic, the impractical, and the hypocritical Transferred epithet

●The condescending view from the fiftieth floor of the city’s

crowds below cuts these people off from humanity.

Simile

●So does an attitude which sees the public only in terms of

large, malleable numbers — as impersonally as does the

clattering subway turnstile beneath the office towers.

●Men and women do their jobs professionally, and, like the

pilots who from great heights bombed Hanoi, seem

unmarked by it.

Irony

●So what else is new?

Euphemism

the defeated are not hidden away somewhere else on the wrong side of town